pontificate etymology

By the early 1800s, "pontificate" was also being used derisively for individuals who spoke as if they had the authority of an ecclesiastic. From Latin pontificatus, from pontifex (“high priest”), from pons (“bridge”) + facere (“make”). 1818, "to act as a pontiff, say pontifical Mass," from Medieval Latin pontificatus, past participle of pontificare "to be a pontifex," from Latin pontifex (see pontiff). Especially "to assume pompous and dignified airs, issue dogmatic decrees" (1825). Meaning "something pontificated; act of pontificating" is from 1925. Noun . pontificate (v.) 1818, "to act as a pontiff, say pontifical Mass," from Medieval Latin pontificatus, past participle of pontificare "to be a pontifex," from Latin pontifex (see pontiff). Related: Pontificated; pontificating. pontificate (third-person singular simple present pontificates, present participle pontificating, simple past and past participle pontificated), Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary, speak in a patronizing, supercilious or pompous manner, During a policy discussion awhile back about New York issues, when Mr. Clinton began to, https://en.wiktionary.org/w/index.php?title=pontificate&oldid=60243919, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License. The etymology of "pontifex" is uncertain, but the word has been used since Roman times. Meaning "to say (something) in a pompous or dogmatic way" is from 1922. This page was last edited on 4 September 2020, at 16:26. ing. pontificate (v.) 1818, "to act as a pontiff, say pontifical Mass," from Medieval Latin pontificatus, past participle of pontificare "to be a pontifex," from Latin pontifex (see pontiff ). The English term derives through Old French pontif from Latin pontifex, a word commonly held to come from the Latin root words pons (bridge) + facere (to do, to make), and so to have the literal meaning of "bridge-builder", presumably between mankind and the deity/deities. [ noun pon- tif-i-kit, -keyt; verb pon- tif-i-keyt ] SEE DEFINITION OF pontificate. Related: Pontificated; pontificating. early 15c., "tenure of a pope;" 1680s, "time during which a pontifical office is held by a particular incumbent," from Old French pontificat and directly from Latin pontificatus "office of a pontiff," from pontifex (see pontifex). pontificate To act officially as pontiff or bishop; especially, to say pontifical mass. From the past participle stem of mediaeval Latin pontificare (“pontificate”), from Latin pontifex (“high priest”), from pons (“bridge”) + facere (“make”).

Meaning "to say (something) in a pompous or dogmatic way" is from 1922. Meaning "to say (something) in a pompous or dogmatic way" is from 1922. 1818, "to act as a pontiff, say pontifical Mass," from Medieval Latin pontificatus, past participle of pontificare "to be a pontifex," from Latin pontifex (see pontiff). (intransitive) To act like a pontiff; to express one's position or opinions dogmatically and pompously as if they were absolutely correct. the government of the Roman Catholic Church. Especially "to assume pompous and dignified airs, issue dogmatic decrees" (1825). pontificate (third-person singular simple present pontificates, present participle pontificating, simple past and past participle pontificated) (intransitive) To preside as a bishop, especially at mass. pontification (countable and uncountable, plural pontifications) The act of pontificating. 1520s, "office of a bishop" (a sense now obsolete), noun of action from past-participle stem of Medieval Latin pontificare (see pontificate (v.)).

Especially "to assume pompous and dignified airs, issue dogmatic decrees" (1825). Etymology.
Etymology . pontificate +‎ -ion. Pontificate derives from "pontifex," and in its earliest English uses it referred to things associated with such prelates. pontificate. to perform the office or duties of a pontiff. The word appears to consist of the Latin word for "bridge" and the suffix for "maker". Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary n Pontificate the dignity of a … to speak in a pompous or dogmatic manner: Did he pontificate … Especially "to assume pompous and dignified airs, issue dogmatic decrees" (1825). Examples of pontificate in a Sentence early 15c., "tenure of a pope;" 1680s, "time during which a pontifical office is held by a particular incumbent," from Old French pontificat and directly from Latin pontificatus "office of a pontiff," from pontifex (see pontifex). Meaning "to say (something) in a pompous or dogmatic way" is from 1922. verb sermonize.